96. Secret Backends

96.1 Generic Backend

Spring Cloud Vault supports at the basic level the generic secret backend. The generic secret backend allows storage of arbitrary values as key-value store. A single context can store one or many key-value tuples. Contexts can be organized hierarchically. Spring Cloud Vault allows using the Application name and a default context name (application) in combination with active profiles.

/secret/{application}/{profile}
/secret/{application}
/secret/{default-context}/{profile}
/secret/{default-context}

The application name is determined by the properties:

  • spring.cloud.vault.generic.application-name
  • spring.cloud.vault.application-name
  • spring.application.name

Secrets can be obtained from other folders within the generic backend by adding their paths to the application name, separated by commas. For example, given the application name usefulapp,mysql1,projectx/aws, each of these folders will be used:

  • /secret/usefulapp
  • /secret/mysql1
  • /secret/projectx/aws

Spring Cloud Vault adds all active profiles to the list of possible context paths. No active profiles will skip accessing contexts with a profile name.

Properties are exposed like they are stored (i.e. without additional prefixes).

spring.cloud.vault:
    generic:
        enabled: true
        backend: secret
        profile-separator: '/'
        default-context: application
        application-name: my-app
  • enabled setting this value to false disables the secret backend config usage
  • backend sets the path of the secret mount to use
  • default-context sets the context name used by all applications
  • application-name overrides the application name for use in the generic backend
  • profile-separator separates the profile name from the context in property sources with profiles

See also: Vault Documentation: Using the generic secret backend

96.2 Consul

Spring Cloud Vault can obtain credentials for HashiCorp Consul. The Consul integration requires the spring-cloud-vault-config-consul dependency.

Example 96.1. pom.xml

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-cloud-vault-config-consul</artifactId>
        <version>1.3.5.BUILD-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

The integration can be enabled by setting spring.cloud.vault.consul.enabled=true (default false) and providing the role name with spring.cloud.vault.consul.role=….

The obtained token is stored in spring.cloud.consul.token so using Spring Cloud Consul can pick up the generated credentials without further configuration. You can configure the property name by setting spring.cloud.vault.consul.token-property.

spring.cloud.vault:
    consul:
        enabled: true
        role: readonly
        backend: consul
        token-property: spring.cloud.consul.token
  • enabled setting this value to true enables the Consul backend config usage
  • role sets the role name of the Consul role definition
  • backend sets the path of the Consul mount to use
  • token-property sets the property name in which the Consul ACL token is stored

See also: Vault Documentation: Setting up Consul with Vault

96.3 RabbitMQ

Spring Cloud Vault can obtain credentials for RabbitMQ.

The RabbitMQ integration requires the spring-cloud-vault-config-rabbitmq dependency.

Example 96.2. pom.xml

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-cloud-vault-config-rabbitmq</artifactId>
        <version>1.3.5.BUILD-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

The integration can be enabled by setting spring.cloud.vault.rabbitmq.enabled=true (default false) and providing the role name with spring.cloud.vault.rabbitmq.role=….

Username and password are stored in spring.rabbitmq.username and spring.rabbitmq.password so using Spring Boot will pick up the generated credentials without further configuration. You can configure the property names by setting spring.cloud.vault.rabbitmq.username-property and spring.cloud.vault.rabbitmq.password-property.

spring.cloud.vault:
    rabbitmq:
        enabled: true
        role: readonly
        backend: rabbitmq
        username-property: spring.rabbitmq.username
        password-property: spring.rabbitmq.password
  • enabled setting this value to true enables the RabbitMQ backend config usage
  • role sets the role name of the RabbitMQ role definition
  • backend sets the path of the RabbitMQ mount to use
  • username-property sets the property name in which the RabbitMQ username is stored
  • password-property sets the property name in which the RabbitMQ password is stored

See also: Vault Documentation: Setting up RabbitMQ with Vault

96.4 AWS

Spring Cloud Vault can obtain credentials for AWS.

The AWS integration requires the spring-cloud-vault-config-aws dependency.

Example 96.3. pom.xml

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.springframework.cloud</groupId>
        <artifactId>spring-cloud-vault-config-aws</artifactId>
        <version>1.3.5.BUILD-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>

The integration can be enabled by setting spring.cloud.vault.aws=true (default false) and providing the role name with spring.cloud.vault.aws.role=….

The access key and secret key are stored in cloud.aws.credentials.accessKey and cloud.aws.credentials.secretKey so using Spring Cloud AWS will pick up the generated credentials without further configuration. You can configure the property names by setting spring.cloud.vault.aws.access-key-property and spring.cloud.vault.aws.secret-key-property.

spring.cloud.vault:
    aws:
        enabled: true
        role: readonly
        backend: aws
        access-key-property: cloud.aws.credentials.accessKey
        secret-key-property: cloud.aws.credentials.secretKey
  • enabled setting this value to true enables the AWS backend config usage
  • role sets the role name of the AWS role definition
  • backend sets the path of the AWS mount to use
  • access-key-property sets the property name in which the AWS access key is stored
  • secret-key-property sets the property name in which the AWS secret key is stored

See also: Vault Documentation: Setting up AWS with Vault